Tag: business

Start Me UP

They say that failure is the universe slapping you across the face and telling you that you’re on the wrong path.

At the start of this year, I was made redundant from my job of four and a half years.

Admittedly I was probably there for two years too long. But I stayed because I was comfortable, proud of what I’d achieved and fond of the people I worked with.

But I wasn’t inspired and I wasn’t firing on all cylinders.

Somewhere along the way I’d lost my ambition, confidence and energy to create.

I’ve spent 2017 trying to find my fire again…

By looking for similar roles in similar companies…

They also say that only a fool does the same thing over again and expects a different result.

And I always thought I was a fast learner…

But I have learned a lot this year. Especially about myself. I’ve learned I’m not someone who is comfortable or motivated in BAU.

I get high off change and challenge. I love walking into uncertainty and confusion, and I love finding opportunities to smooth things out. I get off on challenging the status quo.

It’s hard to maintain the energy for disruption when you are a salaried employee. You get stuck in the BAU, political pressures stand in the way of being brave and doing the right thing by your customers. You get comfortable.

I don’t want to be comfortable. I want to be challenged. I want to be accountable.

So I’m putting myself out there.

Putting my money where my mouth is with Sharper Sherpa: Measurable and Meaningful Marketing and Communications.

Helping businesses who are struggling to see the impact of their investment in marketing and communications understand where, how and why strategies, initiatives, investments, tactics and technology work, and for who.

A supportive, expert guide to help bring together a team to achieve an overwhelming goal.

The fear of failure is there. But without it I would be comfortable. And miserable.

But I need your help.

  • If you’ve read this far, please help a girl out and give the post a like on LinkedIn. I promise I will personally thank you.
  • If you’re feeling really helpful today, please share the post on LinkedIn. I’ll buy you drink next time I see you (those who know me, know that I’m good for that!).
  • I’m also looking for some “test” clients to work closely with, trading a few hours a week of my time, for their feedback and honesty to help craft the best possible proposition.
  • If you know of a SMB who might have an internal marketing coordinator that needs help establishing measures, strategies and focus, or a busy general manager who knows they need to start marketing, but are not sure where. Please send them my way.

You can also:

I’ve had the website up and have been sitting on this blog for a few weeks now.

Hitting the “Publish” button and sharing this with my network is going to be one of the scariest things I’ve done in a while.

But in the end the worst that can happen is that I’ll get another slap in the face from the universe.

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Five things successful managers do before launching every project, campaign or initiative

“If I had one hour to save the world, I would spend 55 minutes defining the problem and five minutes resolving it.” Albert Einstein.

Whether you are feeling the pressure to deliver new product features, designing new marketing campaigns, or planning new business innovation initiatives, you should spend 55 minutes defining the following five things, to set yourself and your team up for success.

Continue reading “Five things successful managers do before launching every project, campaign or initiative”

Work out your zero moment of uncertainty, and crush it

Republished on Idealog Magazine

I recently attended the CFO Summit held at Sky City. As a marketer I wasn’t there to attend the sessions, but to make sure that our exhibit ran as smoothly as planned and did a great job of starting conversations. However one item on the agenda did catch my eye and I went along to hear Andy Lark speak on “The New Marketing Agenda”.

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If I could commercialise my drifting-off-to-sleep-magic I’d be rich

I had an epiphany last night as I was falling asleep. Actually it was a series of epiphanies.

Bear with me.

I started thinking about all the different online and social media things I have done over the years for a wide range of people/product/services, and tried to tie them all together and articulate what I have learned and how I apply what I have learned to each new challenge, in one sentence.

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How to advertise honestly

My journey as an “Apprentice” has come to an end, and it is now time for me to go out to the world, share my learnings and allow someone else the opportunity I have had over the past year. Last Friday I began to put my feelers out there to see what the world has to offer.

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Mediocrity and the real estate agent

In May I was the organiser and marketer of a public event that managed to attract a crowd of 400 people in four days. Overall, most things around the event organisation and execution went perfectly, and most people had the experience we set out for them to have.

But if you are a *tiny* bit of control freak like me, most things and most people aren’t really good enough.

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Crafar farms: why it isn’t the issue

There has been a lot of debate about the Crafar Farms deals, with some kiwis dead against it, some all for it and a minority even pulling out the race card, because no one really kicked up a stink when farmland was sold to James Cameron. However from a “big scheme of things” point of view, even though these deals are very bad for New Zealand’s long-term economic health, they aren’t the biggest fish we have to fry as a nation.

Everyone can agree that New Zealand has an economy reliant on agriculture and farming. Of this dairy exporting is our largest earner, and our own Fonterra controls 1/3 of the world’s international dairy trade.

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Running and business (a shameless plug)

The point of this site isn’t to document my personal life. Facebook is doing that job quite nicely thankyouverymuch. However (you knew that was coming right?) I do feel the need to share a little part of my personal life here, as I think it is relative.

On May 26th I’m doing a 35km trail run in Rotorua, and have been busy training for it with my fellow crazy-in-crime running buddy. Just this past week we ran 22km in the Waitakere Ranges and yesterday we completed 17km on Rangitoto, so you can see, not only do we need some serious psychological therapy, but we also have a lot of time to spend talking jibberish and getting all philosophical about life, work and the future.

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Ladies and Gentlemen, start your engines

The aim of this blog is to share what I learn as I work with, and as, an entrepreneur, but yet all my posts lately seem to be falling back to my default setting of writing about writing.

So the time has come to start writing about starting. (I was inspired to start sharing when I came across this website of the UK government, who are sharing the redesign and relaunch of their site.)

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The art of ideas

Republished on Idealog Magazine

In my time I’ve written many, many business cases, starting when I conceived my first business idea about six years ago (cooking and travel tours in India… I’ve never been to India, I really just wanted to travel there). While doing my MBA I was paid to write business and marketing plans for businesses who didn’t have the ability to write one themselves and I also won the Venture Fund award for a business idea I developed into a plan. In the past six months alone I have written about eight plans in total.

I’ve probably written in the range of 50 plans over the past six years, and of those I’ve written for myself, one has seen the light of day and made it into a business (in the early days, an amazing learning experience, but not a good business idea). Most others have had various stages of success, but for some reason the reality is that they aren’t feasible and they get shelved.

My point is that I use the process of writing a business case to objectively work through an idea that I am excited about before I tell others about it. More often than not, I am able to work out myself why the idea is flawed, and in the cases where I am unsure or still positive I will work through the business case with someone whose opinion I respect.

Lessons I have learned along the way:

Continue reading “The art of ideas”